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NewSplash Archive – September 2019

Issue 39 – 9/24

What is the proper way to clean a Yankauer suction tube?
A: Unscrew and remove the tip for cleaning and inspection. The threads may be cleaned with a nylon brush to remove blood. A lumen brush may assist with the cleaning process. The brush must be the proper diameter and should be longer than the instrument so it exits the distal tip. (p. 321)

Q: What is the most common damage to arthroscopy graspers? (See next issue.)

Achievers: End Infection challenge
It’s time for central service professionals to unite and end infection. Infection cannot be destroyed by a single person; it takes a team working harmoniously with a solitary vision. How did you help end infection in your department? Tell us by entering the Achievers: End Infection challenge.

So You Want to Be a Sterile Processing Manager: How to Get There and What to Expect by Hank Balch
How do you grow from a brand new technician to running the entire sterile processing department as a manager? What steps can you take to grow your résumé and prepare yourself for that big opportunity? While there is no silver bullet to SPD career growth or magic formula for getting a promotion, there are a number of things that you can and should be doing today that can increase your chances of landing that coveted office in the corner of the department. Grab a notepad and let’s get down to the business of leadership.

Hospital-wide use of high-risk antibiotics associated with more C. difficile infections
Higher hospital-wide use of four classes of antibiotics thought to increase the risk of the dangerous intestinal illness Clostridioides difficile were associated with increased prevalence of hospital-associated C. difficile, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Use of hand sanitizer not enough for flu prevention
A study conducted in Japan found that mucus from patients with influenza A remained infectious even after the use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Hand washing with an antiseptic soap yielded much better results, as the influenza A virus was rapidly deactivated.

Robot crawls through the brain to help stroke victims
Scientists at MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies and the national Science Foundation have created a threadlike robot designed to crawl through the brain’s blood vessels to help eliminate blockages that produce strokes. The stringlike robot is a nickel-titanium alloy that provides sufficient flexibility for navigating complex blood vessels in the brain.

OR Today presents Q&A webinar for GI endoscopy professionals
On Thursday, September 26, at 2:00 ET, OR Today will host A Care, Handling, Inspection, and Prevention Program (CHIP) for GI Endoscopy Professionals: A Q&A Webinar. The 60-minute webinar is presented by Dr. Lawrence Muscarella, a consultant for Ruhof, and Ron Banach, director of clinical training for Ruhof.

New Beyond Clean episode now available
This week’s episode is from Season 1 and features Lindsay Brown, former clinical education manager at Key Surgical and current marketing manager at IAHCSMM. The topic is surgical instrument cleaning brushes, covering everything from brushing technique to disinfection and disposal policies. Be sure to take the quiz for CE credit.

 

Issue 38 – 9/17

Is it okay for there to be dents on the suction tube?
A: Yes, if they are minor. Small dents that don’t affect the flow are considered only cosmetic damage. If the dent is severe and a cleaning brush is not able to pass through, the instrument must be repaired or replaced. (p. 321)

Q: What is the proper way to clean a Yankauer suction tube? (See next issue.)

Achievers: End Infection challenge
It’s time for SPD and OR professionals to unite and end infection. Infection cannot be destroyed by a single person; it takes a team working harmoniously with a solitary vision. How did you help end infection in your department? Tell us by entering the Achievers: End Infection challenge.

Specialization on Steroids: Creating & Paying for Real Expertise in Sterile Processing by Hank Balch
Have you ever seen a flight attendant step into the cockpit to land a plane? When was the last time you witnessed a pilot go outside to load passenger luggage and refill the peanut stash? To bring things a little closer to home, how often do you see an anesthesiologist perform a laparoscopic appendectomy? These things do not happen (unless it’s a catastrophic emergency) because these industries—airlines and surgery—understand the importance of specialization. It is assumed that individuals in these roles will focus on their specific job responsibilities and operate as critical team members within their particular specialties. Brain surgeons don’t typically perform C-sections, and orthopods don’t often get called in for pediatric heart procedures.

Swimming hydrogel robot powered by light
Scientists from The UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have developed a new design for a swimming robot that is powered and steered by constant light. The OsciBot is made from hydrogel and moves by oscillating its tail.

New imaging technology could change cancer surgery
Cancer treatment could be dramatically improved by an invention at the University of Waterloo to precisely locate the edges of tumors during surgery to remove them.

Scientists stop common cold in mice and human lung cells
Scientists at Stanford University and the University of California, San Francisco believe they have discovered a way to stop the common cold and related viruses by targeting an essential protein inside our cells that the viruses need to replicate. In experiments conducted by the team, this approach provided complete protection in mice and human lung cells.

OR Today presents Q&A webinar for GI endoscopy professionals
On Thursday, September 26, at 2:00 ET, OR Today will host A Care, Handling, Inspection, and Prevention Program (CHIP) for GI Endoscopy Professionals: A Q&A Webinar. The 60-minute webinar is presented by Dr. Lawrence Muscarella, a consultant for Ruhof, and Ron Banach, director of clinical training for Ruhof.

New Beyond Clean episode now available
This week on Beyond Clean, the hosts continue their discussion with Peggy Spitzer, clinical education and technical support at Certol International, about enzymes and their role in the decontamination and cleaning of medical devices. Tune in and take the exam for CE credit.

 

Issue 37 – 9/10

Where do ENT punches most commonly crack?
A: The most common, and thus the most important, area of inspection is the jaw, especially along the cutting edge. This is not repairable and the instrument must be replaced. (p. 287)

Q: Is it okay for there to be dents on the suction tube? (See next issue.)

Evidence-Based Guidelines and Standards: Following IFUs Results in Best Patient Outcomes by Rose Seavey, MBA, BS, RN, CNOR, CRCST, CSPDT
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and The Joint Commission (TJC) emphasize the need for healthcare facilities to implement evidence-based practices relating to high-level disinfection (HLD) and sterilization. This means following the most current published guidelines and standards.

Achievers: End Infection challenge
It’s time for SPD and OR professionals to unite and end infection. Infection cannot be destroyed by a single person; it takes a team working harmoniously with a solitary vision. How did you help end infection in your department? Tell us by entering the Achievers: End Infection challenge.

Do single-patient hospital room reduce HAI risk?
A recent Canadian study examined whether single-patient hospital rooms might contribute to  decreased rates of common multidrug-resistant organism transmissions and healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The study found that rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization and VRE infection dropped considerably and remained low.

First long-distance robotic heart surgery performed
In a world first, a surgeon in India a series of five heart surgeries on patients lying on operating tables 20 miles away. For the procedure, the Corindus CorPath GRX robot inserted a stent to open blood vessels in the heart.

3D-printed medical device market to skyrocket
IDTechEx, a market research firm, predicts that the global market for 3D-printed medical devices will exceed $6 billion over the next decade. The firm outlined promising developments in additive manufacturing for medical and pharmaceutical application and stated that some segments could see compound annual growth of up to 18% through 2029.

OR Today hosts oneSOURCE Document Site Database Demonstration webinar
On Thursday, September 12, at 2:00 ET, OR Today will host a webinar demonstrating the oneSOURCE Document Site Surgical Instrument, Equipment, and Tissue/Implants Database. The 60-minute webinar is presented by Lindsay Frkovich-Nelson, vice president of sales and marketing at oneSOURCE Document Management Services.

New Beyond Clean episode now available
This week’s guest on Beyond Clean is Peggy Spitzer, clinical education and technical support at Certol International. The topic is the various detergents, disinfectants, sterilants, and other chemicals in the SPD and why your team should become experts in them. Check it out and take the exam for CE credit.

 

Issue 36 – 9/4

What is a bayonet forcep used for?
A: The bayonet-shaped forcep is typically used in the ENT and neurology specialties. This design allows for improved visualization of the surgical site. (p. 260)

Q: Where do ENT punches most commonly crack? (See next issue.)

Hurricane Dorian: How to help
Hurricane Dorian has left a path of complete destruction in the Bahamas, affecting hundreds of thousands of people and causing billions of dollars in damage. And Dorian isn’t through yet. As of this writing, the hurricane is crawling along the East coast of Florida and threatening to make landfall in the Carolinas, where a record storm surge is expected.

FDA recommends transitioning to duodenoscopes with disposable components to reduce infection
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is recommending that duodenoscope manufacturers and healthcare facilities transition to different types of duodenoscopes that may pose less risk to patient safety. Specifically, because of challenges with cleaning these devices for reuse (reprocessing) and persistent high levels of contamination, the agency is recommending moving away from using duodenoscopes with fixed endcaps to those with disposable components that include disposable endcaps—or to fully disposable duodenoscopes when they become available.

Smartphone-based device detects norovirus
Made infamous by outbreaks on cruise ships, norovirus can ruin a vacation, causing severe vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain. But the highly infectious virus can also strike closer to home, with water- and foodborne outbreaks occurring in municipal water systems, schools, and restaurants.

Tiny lensless endoscope captures 3D images of objects smaller than a cell
Researchers have developed a new self-calibrating endoscope that produces 3D images of objects smaller than a single cell. Without a lens or any optical, electrical, or mechanical components, the tip of the endoscope measures just 200 microns across, about the width of a few human hairs twisted together.

OR Today hosts oneSOURCE Document Site Database Demonstration webinar
On Thursday, September 12, at 2:00 ET, OR Today will host a webinar demonstrating the oneSOURCE Document Site Surgical Instrument, Equipment, and Tissue/Implants Database. The 60-minute webinar is presented by Lindsay Frkovich-Nelson, vice president of sales and marketing at oneSOURCE Document Management Services.

New Beyond Clean episode now available
This week, the hosts of Beyond Clean welcome Pawel de Sternberg Stojalowski to the podcast. They discuss augmented reality, virtual reality, and a host of applications that could make your SPDs and teams smarter, safer, and more efficient. Tune in and take the quiz for CE credit.